Indigenous NH 101: Student Reflections

Indigenous NH 101 is a podcast series created by the Indigenous New Hampshire Collaborative featuring Indigenous songs and stories recorded by our collaborators. This episode features the voices of our UNH student interns. We asked them to reflect on their semester as part of this collaborative project and about what they wished their peers knew... Continue Reading →

The Wobanadenok

In celebration of the United Nations International Mountain Day with the theme Mountains Matter to Indigenous Peoples, the Indigenous NH Collaborative collective selected several mountains from the rage of the Woban-aden-ok, in the Algonquian language meaning “to the place of the high white or crystal/mica mountains,” or what Euro-American settlers refer to as the “White Mountains”... Continue Reading →

Reflections on the film “Dawnland”

In the United States (like elsewhere, e.g., Canada, Australia, and New Zealand), the government’s systematic efforts to uproot Indigenous cultures through violence, resettlement, ideology, and education had adverse effects on Native communities and larger society. Among these efforts, Native children were taken from their homes and placed in the institutions (e.g., boarding schools) or with... Continue Reading →

Indigenous NH 101: Maple Syrup

Indigenous NH 101 is a podcast series created by the Indigenous New Hampshire Collaborative featuring Indigenous songs and stories recorded by our collaborators. This episode features Paul Pouliot of the Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook Abenaki People telling the story of maple syrup. Learn about Gluskabe, the Alnombak, and why maple syrup is made the... Continue Reading →

Indigenous NH 101: Cowass

Indigenous NH 101 is a podcast series created by the Indigenous New Hampshire Collaborative featuring Indigenous songs and stories recorded by our collaborators. "Cowass means Place of the White Pines and we are the People of the White Pines." Paul Pouliot "Cowass" features Paul and Denise Pouliot of the Cowasuck Band of the Pennacook Abenaki... Continue Reading →

Methods of Decolonization

Linda Tuhiwai Smith, an Indigenous woman (Ngāti Awa and Ngāti Porou) and Professor of Maori and Indigenous Studies at the University of Waikato in New Zealand, writes about twenty-five indigenous projects that are part of a larger program of Indigenous research. These projects work toward goals of social justice and reclaiming Indigenous culture (Tuhiwai Smith, 1999). A... Continue Reading →

Hannah Dustin

Veiled in the forests of the Contoocook River in Boscawen stands a 35-foot statue of Hannah Dustin, a settler who killed ten Abenaki people and handed their scalps to the Massachusetts General Assembly in 1697. The statue depicts Dustin wearing a "gown that’s falling off her shoulders. In her right hand, she has a tomahawk,... Continue Reading →

Indigenous Foods and Recipes

Have you ever wondered what kind of foods were consumed by Native Americans? While many people believe that Native Americans were exclusively hunter-gatherers, by the time of European contact many groups practiced agriculture. The most commonly grown food items were beans, corn, and squash, which were called the Three Sisters. These staple crops were supplemented... Continue Reading →

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